martinis, bikinis, and lamborghinis.

January 28, 2011

at the carwash

Filed under: favorite posts, pics — brentabousko @ 7:24 pm

BE CAREFUL IN RUSSIA!

Filed under: art — brentabousko @ 7:15 pm









January 25, 2011

black flags

Filed under: favorite posts, foooooood, music, pics — brentabousko @ 10:27 pm

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shoes by eric

Filed under: shoes by eric — brentabousko @ 2:00 am

Wat’s Good Fam!

adidas Originals Samba

adidas Originals Samba

Nike SB Blazer ‘Low End Theory’

Nike SB Blazer ‘Low End Theory’

Be sure and keep an eye out for the Tribe doc coming soon!

Dickies x Converse Chuck Taylor All Star

Dickies x Converse Chuck Taylor All Star

Still got my Dickies on!

January 21, 2011

notorious party boy soundtrack

Filed under: music — brentabousko @ 8:01 pm

http://notoriouspartyboys.com/
 
this is a mix by 2 top djs doing POP music
 
(duran duran, katy perry, lady ga ga, hall & oates, sam cooke, fleetwood mac, david bowie, smiths, etc)
 
its pretty much girl approved.
 
 
 
background:
 
roctakon is a snarky bottle club dj that really just wants to skate and listen to the smiths, pulp, and new order.
 
ross one i don’t know much about, other than he dj’ed jay z/kanye/rihann’s new years eve party in vegas (youtube & pics below)
 
 
dl or stream here : http://soundcloud.com/djrossone/the-notorious-party-boy-soundtrack/s-MxSDu
 
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 
http://worldredeye.com/2011/01/marquee-las-vegas-nye/
 

 

 

kind of awesome

Filed under: animated .gifs, favorite posts — brentabousko @ 12:27 am

January 20, 2011

eliot lee hazel

Filed under: art, favorite posts — brentabousko @ 9:50 pm

via eainthegame

http://eliotleehazel.com/

you just got pregnant

Filed under: animated .gifs — brentabousko @ 7:54 pm

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haircut friendo

Filed under: pics — brentabousko @ 7:43 pm

January 18, 2011

tanuki

Filed under: favorite posts, pics — brentabousko @ 6:57 pm

Tanuki (狸 or タヌキ, Tanuki?) is often mistakenly translated as raccoon or badger, but is in fact a raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides), a canid species native to Japan and other Asian countries. Tanuki have been part of Japanese mythology since ancient times. The mythical tanuki is reputed to be mischievous and jolly, a master of disguise and shapeshifting, but somewhat gullible and absent-minded.

[edit]
Folklore
The current humorous image of tanuki is thought to have been developed during the Kamakura era. The wild tanuki has unusually large testicles, a feature often comically exaggerated in artistic depictions of the creature. Tanuki may be shown with their testicles flung over their backs like a traveller’s pack, or using them as drums. Tanuki are also typically depicted as having large bellies. They may be shown drumming on their bellies instead of their testicles, especially in children’s art.

A common schoolyard song in Japan (the tune of which can be heard in the arcade game Ponpoko) makes rather explicit reference to the tanuki anatomy:

Tan Tan Tanuki no kintama wa
Kaze mo nai no ni
Bura bura bura

Roughly translated, it means “Tanuki’s testicles swing back and forth even when there is no wind blowing.” [1]

During the Kamakura and Muromachi eras, some stories began to include more sinister tanuki. The Otogizoshi story of “Kachi-kachi Yama” features a tanuki that clubs an old lady to death and serves her to her unknowing husband as “old lady soup”. Other stories report tanuki as being harmless and productive members of society. Several shrines have stories of past priests who were tanuki in disguise. Shapeshifting tanuki are sometimes believed to be a transformation of the souls of household goods that were used for one hundred years or more.

A popular tale known as Bunbuku chagama is about a tanuki who fooled a monk by transforming into a tea-kettle. Another is about a tanuki who tricked a hunter by disguising his arms as tree boughs, until he spread both arms at the same time and fell off the tree. Tanuki are said to cheat merchants with leaves they have magically disguised as paper money. Some stories describe tanuki as using leaves as part of their own shape-shifting magic.

In metalworking, tanuki skins were often used for thinning gold. As a result, tanuki became associated with metal mines and metal craftwork and were marketed as front yard decoration and good luck charm for bringing in prosperity.

Statues of tanuki can be found outside many Japanese temples and restaurants, especially noodle shops. These statues often wear a big, cone-shaped hat and carry a bottle of sake. Tanuki statues always have a large belly, although contemporary sculptures may or may not show the traditional large testicles. These exaggerated features represent fertility and plenty.

Tom Robbins’ recent book Villa Incognito has also done much to spread awareness of tanuki, especially in America.

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Pottery statue of tanuki

-In Super Mario Bros. 3, Mario has the ability to change into a tanuki by using a power-up called the “Tanooki suit”. While wearing the Tanooki Suit, Mario gains the ability to turn into a statue, which resembles a stone Jizō. When Mario transforms into Raccoon Mario, he uses a leaf to complete the shapeshifting, like the tanuki of legend. Also, in Super Mario Sunshine, there are raccoons that sell Shine Sprites for 10 blue coins each. The raccoons may possibly be tanuki.

-In Capcom’s Mega Man 6 (Rockman 6 in Japan) video game, the first enemy encountered in Yamato Man’s stage is a Tanuki-like robot which fires explosive bouncing balls from its large belly.

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A fan-drawn example of a semi-traditional drunken tanuki, with distended stomach.

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